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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
-coverage or visit travelers.com. >>> the scandal shaking up the murdoch empire in britain has now reached this shores with some asking whether news corp's activity here in the united states should be scrutinized. today frank lautenberg submitted a letter to the attorney general where he wrote the limited information already reported in this case raises serious questions about the legality of the conduct of news corporation and its subsidiaries under the fcpa. he goes on to say further investigation may reveal that current reports only scratch the surface of the problems at news corporation. accordingly, i am request that doj and the s.e.c. examine these circumstances and determine whether u.s. laws have been violated. the senator's letter mirrors similar outrage from senator rockefeller from west virginia and senator robert menendez of new jersey and today brought news that murdoch abandoned his bid to take over british sky broadcasting. the question remains how much power should one media baron have. joining us now is stephanie gosk. the withdrawal to the bskyb bid is a blow to rupert mu
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
britain. richard, first, help us understand the tabloid culture here. "news of the world," are they beyond the pale, are they that much more sleazy than the rest of the british tabloids, or did they just get caught? >> i think they were, to some extent, in a league of their own in terms of exclusives. and the truth of the matter is, whether it was stories about prince harry and his drug taking, david beckham and his affair or any of the other stories, max mosely of the formula one sensation, whatever it was, their stories always managed to have a certain truth about them. so they had a certain disgusting credibility about it. they were very sure about what they went to press with. as, indeed, all the tabloids are. you can't, you dare not with the british library laws, or what used to be, go to press with a story you're not pretty certain are true or you've got a defense. so you end up with this paper that spews out some of the most vitriolic sewage every week, but frankly, more often than not, gets away with it. >> so the question is, what next? i want to talk more about the specific examp
thank you and good-bye from britain's best-selling tabloid, the latest fallout from the phone hacking scandal on "morning joe." somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> 47 past the hour. after weeks of controversy, resignations and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue on sunday. it comes as its rooival, "the mirror," claims today that a new york police officer asked for voice mails of 9/11 victims. stephanie gosk reports on the "news of the world's" demise and its final day. >> with the ink barely dry on the final edition of news of the world, 80-year-old media baron rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to do damage control. on display, his unqualified support of melissa brooks. smiles for
. this is a lancome makeup ad featuring julia roberts. looks good. it's been banned in great britain along with christy turlington because the images were overly air brushed. fair or unfair. talk about that coming up. >>> let's begin on thursday morning with the time ticking away to reach a deal for the debt ceiling. kelli o'donnell is our capitol hill correspondent. kelli, good morning to you. >> good morning to you. this is a test of john boehner's leadership. he delivered a blunt message to his own republican members to get in line. aides tell me they believe that was more credibility, that was their word, with some of the most conservative members when they retooled their proposal to raise the debt limit and cut spending by going deeper with the cuts, and now, after so much talk, that vote comes today. >> reporter: the politics of chronic gridlock hurts. >> i've had kidney stones that are easier to pass than this. >> reporter: and the prognosis from democrats is dire. >> the speaker's plan is on life support and it's time for him to pull the plug. >> reporter: but house speaker john bo
-war britain yts. and a professor looks at the issues of civil rights in the early 199 's. get the complete weekend schedule at c-span.org/history. this weekend on c-span -- live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker, thomas friedman, talks competitiveness and the economy. look for live coverage saturday at 5:30 eastern and sunday at 1:30 eastern. the national governors association, this weekend online on c-span radio and on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on your screen is congressman john carter, republicans of texas, and as i mentioned before the break, he is a member of the house appropriations committee and also serves as secretary leadership position to the republican conference in the house. well, there's a headline, congressman, on politico, panicky hill scramble for deal. are you feeling a sense of panic about the situation? guest: there's a lot of tension. you can't deny the tension that is everywhere. a lot of the debate is taking place behind closed doors. many people are wondering what's going on. they
opposed to obamacare because i lived under national health in britain for three years and i know what happens. eu end up with a ration care. this last saturday on my program i had a nurse practitioner call in from arkansas who said that already they are being turned down for treatments. they request treatment and are being turned down under medicare because the person is terminal. since they are terminal, the treatment is not worth giving. they suffer and die. there is a woman going blind and that she cannot get treatment for her element that is causing her to go blind, because she is terminal. dr. berwick, put in a recess appointment ito be the head of medicare, is it in a love affair with the british system. they deny people 59.5 because it is not a good investment. even president obama said it was perhaps not the best use of resources to give his grandmother and a hip replacement after she was diagnosed with terminal ccer. i guess she could hobble around in panama she was dying of cancer. that is a -- not the kindh -- whilee around in pain b she was dying of cancer. that is not the
the government is ignoring is the fact that our power grid is ready to go down in 10 years or less. great britain is out one year or less. if that power system goes down, those systems you have built up will not be able to operate. people will lose food. stores will lose food. restaurants will lose food. this happened in world war ii when hitler was in power. they rationed power at 3 days a week. you could not keep food in your refrigerator to last. it is my understanding it would take $1 billion to correct this problem. think of the job creation it would create. guest: great point. there are probably a lot of projects like that to be addressed. the first thing is we have to get a pathway to balance. if we do not do that, we do not have money to do anything. your point is to have congress did into the issues, determine priorities. then let them determine the spending that needs to take place for long-term sustainability of our economy, services, and country. host: bruce cook, the tea party has increased your ideas. guest: we are bipartisan. tosuppaccept anyone who wants support this. i was at a b
. a controversial in vitro lottery will launch in britain giving protective parents winning thousands of dollars towards expensive fertility treatment. tickets of the so-called game will be sold online, and every month. some are now calling the lottery wrong and entirely inappropriate. and this isn't your average invitation, a marine asked mila kuhnous out on a date from afghanistan. >> and just want to one thing i'd like to ask you, like you, on november 18th, from greenville, north carolina with yours truly. take a second, think about it, get back to me. >> wow, the sergeant's got more of the 3rd battalion, 2nd marines posted this on youtube and we don't know if she's watched it yet. no word on her response. those are your headlines. now, time for the 7th annual wounded warrior, injured troops in afghanistan gathered and everything from scuba diving, kayaking, water skiing and more. rick reichmuth is trying to keep up. >> exactly the 7th year this event has been doing on and joined by will parker, you lost your leg on may 31st, i think may 31st and that's a few weeks ago. >> yeah, about four o
guidelines are no near as forceful as some countries like france, britain and israel that has proposed legislation for companies to identify when their ads have been altered. some celebrities have spoken about extreme retouching. kate winslet took legal action for making her too thin and brad pitt ask his "w" magazine cover not be retouched. i got to tell you that sometimes i think my life would be better if i was 10 pounds thinner. how messed up is that? i told that to the ama guy and he says, blame these magazines. >> you don't need retouching quite frankly and i do blame the magazines for making you think that you must be perfect. magazines won't go along with this. with any change, right? >> yeah, the ama is hoping that they'll listen to these guidelines and the girl scouts of america loved what they're doing but the reality of the situation is, you know, photographers and the media and the campaigns really don't want to change anything. >> so talking about the 10 pounds, when the guy made your face fatter. >> he made -- it was really cool set called portrait professional, the p
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)